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Michael J. Horne » Author Archive

Elephants painting? Selfness and the emergence of self states as illustrated in conceptual art

Elephants painting? Selfness and the emergence of self states as illustrated in conceptual art

Journal of Analytical Psychology, 2009, 54, 619–635 Michael Horne, Seattle, USA Abstract: The traditional view of the self is that of a singular entity whose ground is an inherent function of the mind. The more recent conception of the self is moving toward the social constructionist concept that its ground is the discourses of the particular culture into which one is born. These two divergent views have created an irresolvable binary of inner/outer that limits their explanatory … Read entire article »

Filed under: Papers

Book Review: The Sunken Quest, the Wasted Fisher, the Pregnant Fish: Postmodern Reflections on Depth Psychology

Book Review: The Sunken Quest, the Wasted Fisher, the Pregnant Fish: Postmodern Reflections on Depth Psychology

Journal of Analytical Psychology, 2006, 51,149-151 Book Review: The Sunken Quest, the Wasted Fisher, the Pregnant Fish: Postmodern Reflections on Depth Psychology. by Ronald Schenk Wilmette, Illinois: Chiron Publications, 2001. Reviewed by Michael Horne, M.D. Analytical psychology purports to help despairing people repair the tattered meaning of their existence. Many analytical psychologists feel that postmodernist approaches to understanding are relativistic and nihilistic and, therefore, destroy meaning. They wonder how such points of view can be compatible with the practice of … Read entire article »

Filed under: Book Review

The universe of our concerns: the human as person in the praxis of analysis

Journal of Analytical Psychology, 2004, 49, 33–48 Michael Horne, Seattle, Washington Abstract: Since its inception, psychoanalysts and analytical psychologists have used the reductionistic methods of science to explain both human development and analytic practice. The most recent iteration of this tendency uses attachment as the explanatory principle. This disposition has created theories that understand the human solely as an organism. While this is a satisfactory way to view human development, it is not appropriate for the practice of analysis. In this context, the human must be viewed as a person that is explicable in his/her own terms. Interpretation based on reductionism eliminates personhood. Humans appear as persons in ‘the feeling of what happens’ or of ‘being there’, and, on the basis of this experience, develop stories in which their personhood … Read entire article »

Filed under: Papers